How Can I Be “Radical” And Have A “Crazy Love” Kind of Faith?


infinite-fela asked a question:

Hello pastor … Gonna ask you something. How am I supposed to react on this: I’ve been reading the book Crazy Love of Francis Chan, it’s about loving God for real-walking the talk, and I am really moved on it. I want to do the same. I think about things I need to do for Jesus then I feel good about it then when I re-think about it again, I feel like not doing it because it’s hard and I feel so bad about it.

Hey my dear friend, I must first confess that I’m a Francis Chan fanboy for life.  He was one of the first pastors I ever really got into, and I absolutely love his preaching and his heart for Jesus. He’s the real deal. He also has a heartbreaking testimony, and I admire his continual ministry for the poor and to alleviate poverty and hunger.  If you didn’t know, he helped to start up Children’s Hunger Fund and also gave away his entire two million dollars of royalties from book sales to charity.  And perhaps his most famous sermon continues to impact how I live today. [Warning: That sermon could ruin your life.]

His book Crazy Love was pretty good, but I personally think his book Forgotten God is still his best work, and possibly could’ve sold more if it had a more appealing title.  It was one of those books in my faith-journey that actually helped me to break my fifteen year porn addiction.

The one thing with Francis Chan, and other similar pastors, is that they’re speaking to a lukewarm audience of halfway Christians.  He is speaking to those that call themselves Christians but really only have the name-tag.  So the intent of his preaching and writing is for a convicting gut-check to the lukewarm.

In that sense, if you come from a very legalistic church that crippled you with moralistic anxiety, then a “gut-check” is not for you.  A Christian who tend towards legalism needs the uncomfortable, unsettling, reckless grace of God. If you’re a person who’s constantly worried that you’re not doing enough or not “productive,” then I would be very careful to take too much of this kind of medicine.

We all have two extremes.

Continue reading “How Can I Be “Radical” And Have A “Crazy Love” Kind of Faith?”

Four Obstacles To Break On The Way To A Breakthrough

All kinds of motivational literature are good at telling you what’s good and bad. The church is great at beating the dead horse of consequences, drenching it in lighter fluid, and lighting it with napalm. We get it. Sin bad, God is good.

You might as well describe the water that the person is drowning in.

There are always real obstacles in the way of breaking free to a breakthrough. Like spiritual blocks that cut the momentum. What might not seem like a big deal to you might be a big deal to them. Because not everyone thinks like you. This is where it gets messy, messed up, and it’s not so black-and-white. Moving forward is not a straight line, and “sanctification” is less of a light switch than it is a journey.

God understands this and wants to break down each obstacle in the way, one at a time, until you can step forward unburdened by blind spots and dead weight. None of these obstacles make you a bad person, but just misinformed. Jesus didn’t come to make you “un-bad” anyway. He came to give you True Life.

Here are four obstacles to tackle to really break through to the other end of God’s vision. These things are not your fault, but you can choose not to wallow in them.

Continue reading “Four Obstacles To Break On The Way To A Breakthrough”

Quote: Deliverance


In this performancism, we eventually figure out that being the star of our own show actually makes life a tragedy. When life is all about us — what we can do, how we perform — our world becomes small and smothering; we shrink. To have everything riding on ourselves leads to despair, not deliverance.

— Tullian Tchividjian

Quote: Moralism


Moralism beats this drum: If I improve, then I’ll be accepted — by God, by others, even by myself. But the gospel says something radically different. The gospel announces that everyone ‘in Christ’ is already accepted by God because of Jesus’s work for them. Therefore, no improvement, good behavior, or performance is necessary in order to experience the deep acceptance we long for and in fact strive for on a daily basis.

— Tullian Tchividjian