Gratitude Theology

When we “thank God” when good things happen, we can inadvertently imply that God is only good during good times, that He is rewarding us for performance, and that God is punishing those who are suffering. Praising God then cannot be built on the quality of our circumstances, but centers on the God of those circumstances, however good or bad they may be. Basing my gratitude on the situation is a recipe for disillusionment and bitterness.

We easily get addicted to our blessings — but the real blessing is God being present through our ups and downs, no matter how hard it gets. I want to praise God in all seasons, not because the hurt doesn’t hurt, but because He never leaves me to myself. He walks in my healing. It is this sort of faith, even the size of a mustard seed, that will break my addiction to tangible blessings and infuses me with reckless freedom in every season.

— J

12 thoughts on “Gratitude Theology

  1. Along these lines, I am reminded of St Francis de Sales’ words: “If I want pure water, what does it matter whether it be brought in a vase of gold or glass? . . . If I desire and seek God’s will, what does it matter whether it be presented in tribulation or consolation?” God bless!

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  2. I have often explained that God is the reason we are blessed–period–and I’m glad you’ve stated this. We can appreciate this when times are great, not so great, and when he has to walk us through consequences. HE is the reward.

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    1. Agreed. I don’t want to sound trite though and I know that tough times can make us doubt these truths. But looking back, I’ve always been able to walk through the valley because of what I’ve known to be true on the mountain.

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      1. You’re exactly right…you don’t sound trite. I understand fully. Your last line, great words to live by, sounds like Adrian Rogers–“Don’t doubt in the dark what you’ve seen in the light.” Cheers.

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