Archives For working for God

A four part series on connecting Christ with your career, and how he owns it.
1) Restorative2) Creative — 3) Narrative — 4) Connective

Is being a pastor or missionary the only “real work” for God?

The church has missed sorely on exhorting believers to faithful living in their careers, instead lifting “ministry” as a first class calling and degrading a full-time job as bottom-of-the-barrel drudgery. This sort of false divide creates unnecessary tension for those desiring to “work for God,” thinking we can only do so through seminary or your Church Membership class.

We do a great disservice to artists, doctors, musicians, writers, and all the sciences when we relegate them to a dustbin of irredeemable secular scraps.

Here will be four biblical principles derived from the Books of Nehemiah, Daniel, and other places that outline how our individual vocations honor God. The first was Restorative. The second is Creative. The others will be in upcoming posts.

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A four part series on connecting Christ with your career, and how he owns it.
1) Restorative — 2) Creative — 3) Narrative — 4) Connective

In church, they’ll tell you that “giving glory to God” ultimately means becoming a super-pastor, a globe-trotting missionary, or a teacher of systematic theology in the leftover classroom behind the auditorium. We use the word bi-vocational like working for God is one thing and your job is something else. It’s the Sacred/Secular Divide, a myth propagated by greedy pastors looking for free staff, and it’s compartmentalized your everyday churchgoer into guilt-driven church mode.

Following Jesus also means following your calling — what you were individually put on earth to do — and we’ve driven a splinter the size of the church wall right into it. A talented choir singer pursues a singing career and the church scoffs: Why can’t she be a Christian singer? Why don’t she just sing here? A young guy is interested in surgery or cancer research or archaeology or molecular biology, and the church sneers: How can he do science and say he’s still a Christian? You got an artist who draws incredible art on his bulletin during the sermon, and the church has no idea what to do with him. You have future lawyers and military and authors and business owners and we hardly give them biblical patterns except for, “Evangelize when you get there.” And if someone wants to get into Hollywood, acting or directing or producing, you can forget it. Might as well call them a Satan-loving pagan.

In short: the church has done a lackluster job encouraging a generation of called believers to be in-and-not-of, instead burdening them with narrow church-centered shackles that are not one-size-fits-all. There’s this bizarre disconnect between faith and futures that not only misinforms, but simply ignores the specific purpose that God has appointed every single person. Maybe we forgot Bezalel and Oholiab in Exodus 31, who were filled with the Holy Spirit to craft God’s house. No small task. It was their God-given talent to ferociously swing a hammer in the awesome name of the Lord.

Here then, biblically, will be four principles derived from the Books of Nehemiah, Daniel, and other places that outline how our individual vocations honor God. The first of the four is Restorative. The rest will be in upcoming posts.

Continue Reading…